Breakout sessions details are listed below and will be updated in the coming weeks. Biographies for the breakout speakers can be found by clicking the link below.

This breakout is based on the Naace Professional Development Event (PDE) “From Fear to Fun: creative ways to tackle complex concepts in the computing curriculum”. Without the use of any technological equipment, participants learn fundamental principles of information technology, for example, how the internet works, how digital images are transmitted by email, and how databases process search queries. During this breakout participants will experience a selection of tried and tested activities that can be taken back to the classroom and used immediately.

Carol Porter

Carol Porter

Technology Curriculum Support Centre Manager
Carol manages the Technology Curriculum Support Centre in Bury LA (http://www.bplc.org.uk/). Previously Carol worked as a primary teacher with a passion for embedding ICT purposefully across the curriculum. Her MA in education led directly on to doctoral studies, which focussed on the success (or otherwise) of ICT-based CPD. Carol is an active Naace Fellow, a Phase 2 accredited Naace PDE Tutor, and is currently a Naace Lead, with Tim Scratcherd, for the Naace Professional Development Programme (www.naace.co.uk/pde). She regularly runs CPD training sessions. She is Junior Vice Chair of the Naace Board of Management. Carol has significant experience with curriculum development: she was lead author for a comprehensive scheme of work (http://tcsc.primaryblogger.co.uk/2014/12/12/bury-primary-computing-solution/) that meets the requirements of the 2014 Computing Programme of Study in full.
Tim Scratcherd

Tim Scratcherd

Directors of The School House Partnership
Tim is one of the Directors of The School House Partnership, an independent company specialising in the use of Technology for school improvement. Tim is an active Naace Fellow, an ICT Mark Assessor and Third Millennium Learning Guide.  Tim is a former chair of the Naace Board of Management and has been an assistant headteacher in a secondary school, an LA inspector, and an acting principal of a primary school. His Fellowship work for Naace includes day to day support for the operational function of Naace. Carol and Tim have written a series of Naace PDEs and “Essential Guides”.

Why do schools exist? What is our core purpose? What is our vision? What prevents us from attaining our goals and vision? What can we do about this? How can IT help us achieve our goals? Focus on some examples of IT helping to achieve a vision - changing pedagogy; focus on skills through real projects; resilience and a growth mindset; collaboration and the tools to collaborate; the world as a classroom; involving the right people in the process of learning; having fun.

John Hurst

John Hurst

Headteacher of Lever House Primary School in Farington, Lancashire
John started teaching in 1992. He has been a teacher, Deputy Head teacher, IT Consultant, Advisory Teacher and is currently Headteacher of Lever House Primary School in Farington, Lancashire. The common thread through all of these posts has been finding out how technology can positively impact on children’s learning. John has been Headteacher at Lever House for 10 years. Lever House is an Apple Regional Training Centre and an Apple Distinguished School. It was one of the first schools to undertake a self funded 1:2:1 roll out of iPads. Multi media plays a big part in the life of school and all pupils from age 4 upwards use animation, video, photos, apps and other multi media in their learning. The motto of the school is Learning, Creativity and FUN which sums up John’s approach to what education is all about. John specialise in leadership and change management in the use of mobile technology. He has spoken at venues across the UK and at international conferences in India, Portugal, Greece, Austria, Italy and Ireland and undertaken educational visits schools in China and Canada. To see examples of Lever House pupils’ work, please go to http://leverhouse.net or visit his blog (and leave a comment) at http://head.leverhouse.net

Cyber security – for individual teachers and schools – is becoming a top priority as schools are as much at risk of cyber-attack as any other organisation. Becoming cyber aware is important for everyone working in schools, and this is more than e-safety and safeguarding. The Tech Partnership and NAACE have produced a Cyber Security accreditation scheme for all teachers and school staff, in primary and secondary, with funding from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills. Teachers can gain accreditation at levels 1, 2 and 3 in this scheme, the development of which has been supported by members of the cyber security industry. Schools will also be able to become Cyber Aware Institutions in an extension of the scheme launching this year. This session will demonstrate the level 1 accreditation and how to register.

Sue Nieland

Sue Nieland

Sue was a secondary school teacher, ICT Coordinator and Head of Department for 5 years, and a lecturer in psychology in HE for 7 years.  She has undertaken several research projects in education, with a focus on technology, IT and science.  Sue joined e-skills UK, the Sector Skills Council for Business and IT, in 2004 and has since been involved in writing student-facing online materials and teacher support content for Computer Clubs for Girls (CC4G – now TechFuture Girls) and the Diploma in IT. Sue is now a Director of Education at The Tech Partnership (formerly e-skills UK) and leads the TechFuture Classroom programme, writing online materials for students and CPD content for teachers in partnership with employers, and working to integrate Open Badges into both.

As young people’s engagement with online technology becomes increasingly more sophisticated, it’s apparent that many of the legacy online safety messages have less resonance and limited impact with the group for which they were originally shaped. In an online world of open social transparency, how do we educate to build a resilience in our children that allows them to navigate those burgeoning issues of privacy, reputation, responsibility and harm, whilst harnessing the massive potential technology offers? What is our role as educators in ensuring these aspects have positive outcomes in terms of empowerment and well-being?

Ken Corish

Ken Corish

Online Safety Director, South West Grid for Learning Trust
Ken is Online Safety Director with South West Grid for Learning Trust and the UK Safer Internet Centre and a member of the Grid’s senior management team.  He has wide education experience, drawing on twenty years as a teacher and school leader and ten years as a BECTA award-winning Education Adviser with Plymouth’s ICT Team. His subsequent work around E-safety education, intervention and school improvement has developed from a pragmatic understanding of school need. This work includes education programmes for students and staff; development of school improvement strategies and production of innovative e-safety support materials. His blog, Online Reflections, is read regularly by a wide range of peers. Ken’s broad canvas of experience and engaging presentation style has seen him work with a wide range of educators and agencies including schools, universities, social care, teacher’s unions, police, local authorities, Ofsted and other government organisations. He has trained all Education, Social Care and Early Years HMIs in aspects of online safeguarding and is responsible for shaping inspectors briefing sheets and training in online safety. He formed the concept of, developed and wrote the multi award-winning 360 degree safe online safety self-review tool and Online Compass tool for groups that work with young people. Along with fellow director, David Wright, he also created the BETT award-winning BOOST toolset for children’s settings. He is a published author and musician. He works with a broad range of national and international organisations that include Childnet, CEOP, InSafe, NCMEC, FOSI and Internet Watch Foundation and has spoken at global conferences in the Middle East, South Korea, Azerbaijan, Greece, Spain, Estonia, Europe and the US. He still works regularly with children and young people and educators; he promises he will not reference his own 4 children (or 5 grandchildren) as edtech exemplars.

This session will begin with an introduction in to the background behind the BBC micro:bit project, followed by a hands on session exploring the BBC micro:bit website. The session will end with informative ideas and suggestions for using the micro:bit in the classroom.

Yvonne Walker

Yvonne Walker

CAS Hub Champion
Yvonne is the National Hub Champion for Computing At School. She was also the consultant for the QuickStart Computing CPD Toolkit for Teachers, funded by the DfE and Microsoft (http://quickstartcomputing.org/). Yvonne is an inspirational and motivational educationalist with a successful career in teaching, educational leadership and transformation, with a determination that every learner will achieve. With experience that encompasses leadership and transformation roles in schools in rural, suburban and inner city areas as well as broader roles leading learning and teaching initiatives at a local authority, regional and national levels. Yvonne was a Computing At School Level 2 Master Teacher, a position funded by the Department for Education leading and co-ordinating training and professional development for primary teachers on the new computing curriculum (2013 - 14). In September 2014, Yvonne was appointed the National CAS Hub Champion for Computing At School (CAS). This involves supporting schools to set up as CAS Hubs. A CAS hub is a meeting of teachers and lecturers who wish to share their ideas for developing the teaching of computing in their schools, their classrooms and their community. It is a meeting of like-minded professionals with the general objective of supporting each other and the specific aim of providing (at least) one idea that can be taken and tried in the classroom. Yvonne’s recent work through the CAS Hubs has been focussed on the pedagogy of Computer Science and how it can be taught in creative ways. She gives regular presentations and leads workshops to computing teachers in the UK to help them to develop their practice.